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throughout history. .artin luther use the pamphlets poetry in the court of and berlin. tom payne and his pamphlet of common sense. there are many examples. i'm arguing that when we use social media today, it is a reversion to what media operated like centuries before us. >> the distinct between letterwriting and the conversation was further blurred by the custom of dictating outgoing letters described and having incoming letters read aloud. you were someone like cicero or caesar, you would have ascribed. caesar was famous for being able to dictate to letters at once. you would be dictating letters to them. you would have a staff of messengers who would carry these messages to your friends. incoming messages brought a scroll. romans like cicero and caesar were capable of reading and writing. they got more done if they use describes. the role played by scribes and messengers, most of her slaves, is akin to the role that broadband plays for us today. the reason why we can do social media that is very tweet -- cheap and fast. when the romans it was also cheap and fast. they had slavery. it w
o'rielly have been confirmed by the senate. joining us this week to discuss the sec's agenda for the coming year, sam gustin of "time magazine." what you think is the number one priority for the fcc? >> i would say the biggest priority, the biggest immediate priority, is the spectrum incentive option that is scheduled for next summer. that is enacted by the to sell to sell thee fcc spectrum to address the growing spectrum crunch, which is being driven by the massive proliferation of smartphones and tablets. >> assess confirmation hearing, tom wheeler talked about the upcoming spectrum auctions. here is what he had to say. i want to get your response. [video clip] >> the incentive option, as i said, is something that has never been tried before. , liken it to a rubik's cube that over on the side of the cube, you have got to provide an incentive for broadcasters to want to auction their spectrum. on this side of the cube, you have got to provide a product that is structured in such a way that incentivizes the wireless carriers or whoever the bidders thate to want to bid for spe
who have paired with us and watch the hearing from overflow rooms since we did not hold this outside of the traditional hearing room. we appreciate your forbearance and you're watching the democratic process in the overflow rooms. the record will be open until the close of business on thursday and thanks to the committee and all of you. this committee is adjourned. .. for her visit to sandusky show show was shown this red suit as a showing of support for the maple leaf. i admire the thought she put into her wardrobe and shoe knew the advantage of picking out a color. >> brought to you as a public service. >> for the first time in many months, we have now new members. joining us to discuss the fcc's agenda is sam gustin. what do you think is the main priority for the fcc? >> i would say the biggest immediate priority is the spectrum auction that is scheduled next summer. and that is to sell the existing spectrum for broadcasters to address the growing spectrum crush that is being driven by the smart phones and tablets. >> tom wheeler talked about the upcoming spectrum auctions. here i
entities, third arty institutions, no about us based on our web presence. in of human resources people companies check your online profile before they interview you for a job. one in four college admissions officers are looking at the students before deciding on them. your internet self may be more important than your physical self. a lot of these institutions think they know who you are and impression andse discriminated against you as a result. >> are we more willing to put ourselves out there online than we are in person? >> yes. there are studies that say women are more willing to reveal things in person but men, who are notoriously closed mouth in person, are more revealing of themselves on the web. if you think about it, think of the information facebook has on over a billion people. and know your political sexual preference, who your friends are and what you like, what your dogs name is. all these sorts of things. said, ifity analyst the government had asked you directly for that sort of information, it would have taken money, lawyers, and even guns, to get you to cough up the i
. louisville said that her deductible will double. premiums will go up as well. to start a for us family next year, it will cost over 50% of our combined family income before we even get insurance to cover that child. another woman, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis 14 years ago. she is about to lose her coverage. when trying to sign up for a new plan, she was told she had to have her identity verified. she went through all the steps to do that, but then she never heard back. when she called a couple of weeks later to find out how long it would take, they had no answer. this is beyond stressful she writes. can i continue to see mine are can i continue to see mine apologist? neurologist? isn't this the uncertainty that the president promised effects? people are questioning his uncertainty and their right to do so. our physician, i know health care system needs improvement, but this law is failing. the best thing we can do is to scrap it and start over with a step-by-step approach to focus on lower cost and patient solutions. for now, we will continue the tough questions. we will hold the p
chairman tom wheeler and republican michael o'reilly have been confirmed by the senate. joining us this week to discuss the fcc's agenda for the coming year, sam gustin of "time" magazine. mr. gustin, what do you think is the number one priority right now for the fcc? >> guest: well, i would say the biggest priority, the biggest immediate be priority is the spectrum incentive auction that's scheduled for next summer. and that's an effort by the fcc to sell existing wireless spectrum that's opened by the tv broadcasters -- that's owned by the tv broadcasters for use by the big wireless companies to address the growing spectrum crunch which is being driven by the massive proliferation of smartphones and tablets. >> host: well, at his confirmation hearing, tom wheeler talked about the upcoming spectrum auctions. here's what he had to say, want to get your response. >> the incentive auction, as i said, is something that's never been tried before, and i liken it to a rubik's cube, that over on this side of the cube you've got to provide an incentive for broadcasters to want to auction t
in this country. basicvide what used to be telephone service. they are now broadband providers. they have also become the one- stop shop service providers for immunity's. they do video, wireless, data centers, whatever technologies their communities require. we resent their interests here in washington, d.c. >> who are some of your members? >> we have everywhere from the largest cooperative in the telecommunications cooperative in south carolina with 100,000 subscribers, to numerous small companies, family-hell, locally owned. that have 400 or 500 subscribers a piece. if you looked at the map of the united states, we serve about 40% of the landmass but about 5% of the kinds -- customer base. when you think about here in washington, where you have a large provider providing service, 130 scrappers, my folks -- subscribers per mile. my folks average six or seven consumers per mile.. differentr concerns than the verizons, at&ts? >> by definition. when you think about what a rural community looks like, that you have a huge obstacle of distance. geography that kind of works against you. my folks are
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7